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Pearls Of Wisdom: The White Dragon School Blog

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White Dragon Martial Arts - Spirit of the Dragon

One of the biggest things that sets White Dragon apart from other martial arts schools is our connection to tradition. A tradition that teaches not only a highly effective fighting system, but also the values that help students do well in everyday life. Values like respect for self and others, health, discipline, positive attitude, and martial spirit are a central part of traditional martial arts.

Wearing our school’s uniform is one important way you can express your support for the traditional roots of our system, and the values that system represents. It is for this reason that I ask each of you to wear the uniform proudly whenever you attend a lesson, class or do a personal workout at the school. Only when participating in combative workouts with others is it appropriate to wear the school’s black combative shorts and a school t-shirt.

The traditional Chinese jacket, kung-fu pants, and rank sash are hallmarks of traditional Chinese martial arts, and are meant to represent a student’s dedication to the school’s training and values. With this understanding, it becomes clear that wearing just any workout clothes when in the school falls far short of the kind of commitment to tradition we seek. Additionally, as a student moves up in rank, we depend on him or her to help our instructors teach the newer students by setting a good example in every way possible, including the wearing of the school’s traditional uniform.

As teachers and students of one of San Diego’s oldest and largest traditional martial arts organizations, we should be proud of what we have built together. Successful traditional schools that have been around as long as White Dragon are few and far between. So, help us celebrate the spirit and values of White Dragon by wearing our school’s uniform with pride.  

Nathan Fisher - Founder, White Dragon Martial Arts

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At White Dragon’s One-Day Summer Sale, subscribe and get connected to our school’s new Video Training Program. Learn directly from Master Nathan Fisher, the Founder of White Dragon Schools! Plus, save up to 40% on all training equipment or upgrade your membership and accelerate your progress to the Black Sash. Don’t miss out on super Summer savings!

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From time to time, students with backgrounds in the gi arts (those who wear a gi to train like Karate, Judo, & Jiu Jitsu) ask the equivalent terms of dojo, kata and gi in Chinese.

The most popular term is dojo. "Do" in Chinese is ado, which means the Way. This "way" is the spiritual way, which is spoken of in Chinese religions. "Jo" in Chinese is chang, which means the place. Dojo is the same daochang in Chinese character writing. It means the place to practice the "way", "do" or dao.

Let's take a look at the gi arts. Karate-do means the "way of empty hand." Judo means the "way of the soft art" and Tae Kwon Do means the "way of the foot and the fist." Aikido means the "way of combining or harmonizing the qi". The term dojo is the place to practice the martial arts mentioned above and doesn't mean school or academy.

Dojo or daochang originally came from Taosist and Buddhist terminology. It's a place to practice or cultivate the spiritual way, "do" or dao. 

White Dragon Martial Arts Clairemont Sunset

Today, the term daochang in China refers to the place that performs ceremonies of the dead. While the term dojo uses the same Chinese characters as "daochang," today it has nothing to do with the martial arts. Some people use the term "guan" or Cantonese "goon" or "kwoon."

"Kwan" means the same thing in Korean. The word "guan" is used for more than martial arts. It can be chan guan, the restaurant; lu guan, the hotel; tushu guan, the library; shu guan, the old term for regular schools; yi guan, the clinic; cha guan, the tea shop; shuhua guan, the art gallery; yan guan, the smoke shop; and many more beside just kung-fu studio or wu guan. Most Chinese in the West use the English term "studio" instead of the Chinese term guan or kwoon, because the word guan has too many meanings. In other words, there is no equivalent term in kung-fu for the term dojo.

Kata is the next popular term students are always asking about. Kata is a tao or taolu in Chinese. When speaking in the Chinese language with another Chinese person, the correct way to say hand kata is kuen too for Cantonese and guan tao in Mandarin. The weapons kata is bingqi taolu, which is a general way of using the phrase. When breaking the term down into different weapons we use the these terms: long weapon kata is chang bingqi taolu and short weapon kata is duan bingqi taolu. The double weapon kata is ruan bingqi taolu. Let's break it down to the individual weapons. Staff kata is gun tao; spear kata is qiang tao; straight sword kata is jian tao; and broadsword is dao tao. Just keep adding the Chinese weapon term in front of "tao" for all other weapons.

The above terms are most likely used by non-Chinese instructors. I use the term non-Chinese, because the Chinese would not use taolu as placement term for kata when speaking to their English-speaking students. Chinese instructors would use English terms such as set, pattern or form. For example, for hand kata they would say "the hand set" instead of the hand taolu or quan tao.

Gi is another word for robe. It originated from judo (jiu jistu) practitioners and is made with heavy cotton-like canvas for grabbing and throwing. When karate masters began teaching their students, they adapted the gi from judo and made it into a lighter-weight uniform for student training.

Kung-fu schools in China don't have a particular training outfit. You often see wushu performers wear a nice exhibition Chinese outfit when they perform. Each performer is wearing a different color as well as a different outfit. Therefore, it's not even a uniform. To call it a uniform, everyone must wear the same outfit. In the 1970's when kung-fu was becoming well known in the Western world, some kung-fu schools had their students wear Chinese-style kung-fu clothing when training. Some people called it a kung-fu gi. However, the Chinese don't know what a gi is, because it doesn't mean uniform, nor does it mean robe.

by Doc Fai Wong


by Quinn Early

People are always looking for ways to improve health and get in better shape. They need to look no further than martial arts for the answer. Looking better and feeling stronger and healthier are the major byproducts of adopting a martial arts discipline. There are as many debates about the best way to build strength and increase fitness as there are styles available to the practitioner.

Quinn Early Power of the Animals

I began my martial arts training in 1990 when I was drafted by the San Diego Chargers. Shortly after my second season in the NFL, I began looking for ways to improve my football skills and overall health. Since I was a huge Bruce Lee fan growing up, I thought a great way to get in shape was learning kung-fu. After all, despite his smallish stature, Lee was a physical marvel. If I could incorporate some of the training techniques that made him pound-for-pound the fastest and most powerful martial artists of his generation, those skills might help me become a better, more effective football player.

I sought the help of a kung-fu instructor in my area and settled on the fantastic, diverse world of Shaolin Five Animal kung-fu, which incorporates the best of both the internal and external disciplines of Chinese martial arts. 

HEALTH BENEFITS

Shaolin five animal kung-fu teaches many fighting techniques, but more importantly it gives the martial artists a great foundation through stance training, breathing applications and a mixture of internal and external energy training. All these attributes help build strength, power and overall health.          

Many factors make the five animal form optimal for health and martial arts cultivation: the practitioner will develop physical strength, libido, chi development, bone development and internal spirit. Since these are a mixture of both internal and external training techniques, it is said that when these five things are combined the result is a far superior martial artist.

HISTORY

Chan (Zen) Buddhism was introduced to China around A.D. 550. During the North-South dynasty, a monk named Bodhidharma traveled from India to Songshan Mountain in the Henan province, the site of the Shaolin Temple. There he meditated for nine years. At the age of 76, he began teaching healing arts to the monks of the temple. Since the monks spent much of their time in meditation, they were in poor physical condition. Bodhidharma gave them a set of exercises that would develop the physical strength necessary to maintain the monastery and protect them in the event of an attack. He gave them three exercises: lohan shi ba (18 hands of arhats); yi ji jing (book of changing tendons); and xi shui jing (book of washing bone morrow). At the end of the Ming dynasty (1368-1644), Zhue Yuen, Li Sou and Bai Yu Feng developed the fine animal form, which helped to complete the new shaolin system and had a major impact on the state of shaolin kung-fu.

THE FIVE ANIMALS

The shaolin five animals consist of dragon, tiger, snake, crane and leopard. Each animal has characteristics that provide the practitioner with an array of offensive and defensive techniques. Only through a mastery of each of these animals can one hope to become a complete kung-fu stylist.

DRAGON (LONG XING)

The Chinese dragon represents internal strength. Contrary to popular belief, there is no relation to the Western dinosaur or fire-breathing dragon. Instead, according to Buddhist writings, the Chinese dragon is a mystical creature that can show itself to those he wants, especially to those who have reached the highest levels of enlightenment. Chinese dragons also are said to live in oceans or large bodies of water and are believed to produce rain. They can make themselves large or small, and are sometimes said to be visible within the clouds if you look closely.

The dragon form combines internal and external energy to produce awesome and devastating strikes. Dragon techniques feature circular movements that can penetrate with sudden explosiveness. Though the claw is the primary hand technique used within the dragon form, there are also various palm and fist attacks that add to the dragon form’s effectiveness. However, using the waist in a whipping action to generate power is essential to the development of proper dragon energy. The dragon form uses internal conditioning through proper breathing techniques to develop qi (internal energy). This is done by using the lower body to pull in air with relaxed breaths. The breathing develops flexibility, strength and power.

TIGER (HU XING)

In China, the tiger is said to be the king of all land beasts. The Shaolin Monks adopted the spirit of the tiger for its courage, strength and power. Because its energy is external in nature, the energy of the tiger is different from the other animals in the form. The tiger’s strength comes from hard-pressing attacks. Developing a strong back and neck is essential for strong stances. The primary technique in the tiger form is the tiger claw, which targets the opponent’s face, neck, groin, arms and wrist. The tiger form also utilizes palm strikes, fists and special kicking techniques, such as the tiger tail kick (fu mei geuk). Like the dragon, proper breathing is important for developing power and force. The practitioner produces certain sounds to expel carbon dioxide and replace it with the oxygen necessary to deliver the proper energy within his strikes.

SNAKE (SHE XING)

The snake form is important for developing qi within the five animal form. Because the snake is a calm animal, it has more relaxed energy. When the practitioner cultivates this energy, the combination of relaxation is mixed with quick, piercing strikes. There are no closed fists within the snake form. Instead, the hands are open and used for penetrating chops and finger strikes. The snake’s spirit is calm and deliberate and once the practitioner develops the proper energy, his strikes are focused and lightning-fast.

CRANE (HE XING)

The crane is known for its longevity. It is believed that the crane lives such a long life because its body contains a large amount of jing, or essential energy. A calm, meditative animal, the crane can stand on one leg for hours, without shifting its weight or growing restless. The crane form helps the practitioner hold his internal energy, which develops strength while building bones and muscles.

Like the dragon, crane techniques are circular in nature. However, the crane is always soft and relaxed, but strikes with penetrating speed and force. The crane form is known for using the “beak” to strike to targets such as the temple. It is also known for its long, extended strikes that mimic outstretched wings. The crane form allows the practitioner to deliver flowing, relaxed power as well as sudden and focused attacks.

LEOPARD (BAO XING)

In China, the leopard’s fierce and ferocious power yields only to that of the tiger. Though the leopard is smaller animal, it is believed to be, pound for pound, stronger. The leopard relies on a lightning-fast, powerful force that is produced from relaxed, whip-like techniques. It is important for the practitioner to develop a flexible waist, which allows him to develop quick footwork and explosive strikes.

Since the leopard form focuses on quick movements, there is little internal energy training. But the internal strengths of the dragon and snake blended with the speed and force of the leopard make a devastating combination. The mail technique used in the leopard form is a leopard fist that penetrates vital areas of the opponent’s body, such as the throat, solar plexus and groin. There are also elbow and forearm techniques. The leopard’s footwork is quick and short, which helps the practitioner develop strong stable stances.

3 STAGES OF TRAINING             

Once the five animal practitioner has mastered the pattern within the form, he practices the three states of training. In the first stage, the practitioner performs the whole form slowly, mimicking tai chi or moving meditation. The slow and soft movements massage the organs and lead to health and longevity. The martial artist also learns the essence of each animal by moving slowly and methodically. Breathing is deep and from the abdomen to improve the circulatory system and build the practitioner’s qi.

The second stage of training is practiced with external power. The emphasis is on conditioning the bones, tendons and muscles, while developing speed and power. This type of training helps the practitioner build strong stances while increasing stamina and external strength. The five animal practitioner puts all his skills together in the third stage of training. The emphasis is on the spirit and strengths of each animal – both internal and external energy are intertwined to give each animal life within the form.

The snake and crane forms are preformed with relaxation and soft, or internal, energy until explosive power is released at the moment of impact. The tiger and leopard produce devastating, lethal attacks that are performed with quick and powerful, yet relaxed, external energy. The dragon combines both internal and external movements to deliver powerful techniques.

Five animal training not only provides the martial artist with the strength and power for devastating fighting techniques, but also teaches him to remain calm and relaxed in even the most dangerous self-defense situations.

I have truly benefited from the health aspects I received from studying five animal kung-fu. My kung-fu training contributed greatly to my success and longevity in the NFL and even though I am now retired, five animal remains an integral part of my physical and emotional well-being. (For a better understanding of the shaolin five animal form, read “Shaolin Five Animal Kung Fu” by grandmaster Doc-Fai Wong and Jane Hallander. For more information visit the plum Blossom International Federation at www.plumblossom.net.)

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Quinn Early White Dragon Martial Arts

Quinn Early transitioned from a life in the NFL to Being a Hollywood Stuntman

by NBC7's MJ Acosta

Let’s take a trip back to 1988 when Quinn Early was the 3rd overall pick for the Chargers. The young up and coming wide out hit the ground running, literally. Early played 12 seasons in the NFL but like many players, he was thinking ahead at what would come after his grid iron days.

As if getting hit on the football field wasn’t enough, Early found himself working as a stunt man after a fateful call from a friend. He remembers the day he shot his first scene saying, “Next thing I know I’m on the back of a pick of truck shooting a machine gun. And when the weekend was over they paid me. And I was like I can get paid to do this?”

Early says the transition was fairly seamless, “When they yell action, all eyes are on you. It’s like catching that bomb all eyes are on you,” says Early of the excitement of being on set.

The former wide receiver also had another passion that helped him in his stunt work. For almost 26 years now Early studies and teaches the art of Kung Fu. After nearly a lifetime of extremely physical activity, he found that eventually you can only push your body so far before you start to feel the pain. After suffering from sporadic back pain, Early had MRI’s taken and found he had three herniated discs in his lower back.

Even though he has to take it easy, Early continues to teach at White Dragon Martial Arts here in San Diego. His female students tell me he’s helped them learn how to protect themselves from potential attackers. Now he’s taking one step further through a new business venture. The “Stroovy” app is what Early describes as the “yelp for online dating.”

Early says, “Stroovy is a third party review application to help online daters make more informed choices within the online dating world. Stroovy gives online daters a tool that will help them to make better decisions about with whom to spend their time. 

That’s right, the former NFL player and Kung Fu master is helping those searching for love stay safe. The app has been live in the San Diego area for almost a month. Early hopes it will pick up steam nationally while he continues to heal.

Source:  http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/sports/Former-Chargers-Player-goes-from-the-Grid-Iron-to-the-Big-Screen 

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White Dragon has been nominated for Best Martial Arts School in San Diego County! Click on the link to cast your vote!

 

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Tai Chi, the centuries-old Chinese mind-body exercise, now gaining popularity in the United States, consists of slow-flowing, choreographed meditative movements with poetic names like “wave hands like clouds,” “dragons stirring up the wind,” and “swallow skimming the pond”. Although Tai Chi may evoke images of the natural world, it also focuses on basic components of overall fitness: muscle strength, flexibility, and balance.

Doing Tai Chi makes me feel lighter on my feet,” says Catherine Kerr, a Harvard Medical School (HMS) instructor who has practiced for 15 years. I’m stronger in my legs, more alert, more focused, and more relaxed—it just puts me in a better mood all around.” Valentia Di Pietro Blue Fringe White Dragon Martial Arts

Western scientific understanding of Tai Chi’s possible physiological benefits is still very rudimentary. Tai chi is a very interesting form of training because it combines a low-intensity aerobic exercise with a complex, learned, motor sequence. Meditation, motor learning, and attentional focus have all been shown in numerous studies to be associated with training-related changes—including, in some cases, changes in actual brain structure—in specific cortical regions.

Scholars say Tai Chi grew out of Chinese martial arts, although its exact history is not fully understood, according to one of Kerr’s colleagues, assistant professor of medicine Peter M. Wayne, who directs the Tai Chi and mind-body research program at the Osher Center. “Tai chi’s roots are also intertwined with traditional Chinese medicine and philosophy. Though these roots are thousands of years old, the formal name Tai Chi chuan was coined as recently as the seventeenth century as a new form of kung fu, which integrates mind-body principles into a martial art and exercise for health.”

Tai chi, considered a soft or internal form of martial art, has multiple long and short forms associated with the most popular styles taught: Wu, Yang, and Chen (named for their originators). Plenty of people practice the faster, more combative forms that appear to resemble kung fu, but the slower, meditative movements are what many in the United States—where the practice has gained ground during the last 25 years—commonly think of as tai chi.

Hester Tai Chi Green Fringe White Dragon Martial ArtsSurveys, including one by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, have shown that between 2.3 million and 3 million people use tai chi in the United States, where a fledgling body of scientific research now exists. The center has supported studies on the effect of tai chi on cardiovascular disease, fall prevention, bone health, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis of the knee, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic heart failure, cancer survivors, depression in older people, and symptoms of fibromyalgia. One study on the immune response to varicella-zoster virus (which causes shingles) suggested in 2007 that tai chi may enhance the immune system and improve overall well-being in older adults.

However, “in general, studies of tai chi have been small, or they have had design limitations that may limit their conclusions,” notes the center’s website. “The cumulative evidence suggests that additional research is warranted and needed.”

Original article by Nell Porter Brown, Harvard Magazine.

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One of the biggest selling points of internal Chinese martial arts are their health and longevity benefits. You know, practice tai chi and life becomes better for you.

Well, that’s true. However, people question why several famous tai chi and hsing-I masters have died at relatively young ages. If we who teach tai chi tell the public that internal martial arts promote longevity and health, why did these well-known masters die so soon? Those people’s early deaths resulted from the lifestyles, not their martial art. Actually, if they didn’t know tai chi or another internal martial art, they probably would have died much sooner.

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Well-known martial arts masters around the turn of this century had far different lifestyles than the ordinary martial teacher. They often worked for rich families, who exposed them to all of the excesses available to the wealthy – opium, women, alcohol, and gambling. Before long their social habits cut into their tai chi practice time. They spent more time gambling, drinking and carousing, and less time practicing tai chi. They ate more of the wrong foods, increasing their cholesterol levels and overtaxing their digestive tracts. The best tasting food was not always the healthiest food, especially when they didn’t get enough exercise to digest their extra fat.

They slept fewer hours, stressing themselves with addictive habits. In China, before the People’s Republic, the upper-class fashion was to smoke opium. Of course, only those who could afford it smoked it. Many great masters, whom I will not name, with respect for their martial arts fame and leadership, became wealthy from teaching government officials and rich families. Unfortunately, their opulent lifestyles outweighed their internal training, and they died young.

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The Dragon Cup Championship is set for Saturday, May 7 2016 at the Jenny Craig Pavillion, University of San Diego. White Dragon's Annual School Tournament has become one of the largest martial arts tournaments in the country. Don't miss your opportunity to represent your school and gain valuable experience!

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On Saturday, January 16, Master Nathan Fisher will be holding his annual seminar series for all Accelerated Black Sash Members at White Dragon Martial Arts Mira Mesa. 

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Are traditional martial arts incapable of change? Do contemporary martial arts lack foundation and substance? These are two critical questions facing practitioners as they begin the process of choosing a style. What will happen, they ask, if their traditional martial art must grow to meet 20th century demands? Can it sustain such change? Or, is this new art secure enough to withstand the hands of time? Is there enough moral fiber to carry it through the rough times? The only way to answer these difficult questions is to compare and contrast traditional and modern styles.Tai Chi for Seniors San Diego

According to the Oxford American Dictionary, tradition is “the handing down of beliefs or customs from one generation to another.” A traditionalist, the same source says, is a “person who follows or upholds traditional beliefs.” Therefore, a traditional martial art constitutes a style which has been standardized and passed through generation after generation of martial artist.

Three examples of traditional martial arts are Choy Li Fut, Kuk Sool Won and Kenpo. Choy Li Fut originated in the mid-1800s in China and included principles handed down from previous generations, its founder, Chan Heung, Borrowed the best techniques from three teachers (one from northern footwork, one from southern fist and one from southern Buddhist palm) and created one kung-fu style, The Korean martial art of Kuk Sool Won is a new traditional system, Although developed as late and early 1960s, it is a collection of ancient techniques and principles derived from original Korean martial arts.

Even more contemporary is Ed Parker’s Kenpo, an American Chinese martial art based on traditional martial systems. However, since the same Kenpo techniques and forms are taught in standardized fashion in virtually all the system’s schools, tradition has come to the style. According to the same reference book, modern is described as “new and experimental, not following traditional styles.”

Certainly Bruce Lee’s art of Jeet Kune Do could be called modern, However, assuming each legitimate Jeet Kune Do school is teaching the same principles, it also has earned the right to be called traditional. Lee and his followers believed JKD constituted a revolutionary step in martial concept by replacing worn fighting methods. But if that’s true, could JKD also meet the same fate in 50 to 100 years? Do JKD practitioners have to periodically change Lee’s concepts and teaching to maintain the art’s modern image?

mma bag workoutOne can plainly see that traditional modern are prone to overlap. A good martial art will encourage its instructors to make changes for the betterment of the system. At the same time, instructors of more recently developed systems (like mma or mixed martial arts) should refrain from calling traditional styles obsolete. After all, even the new martial arts have a background in the fundamental teaching of the ancient systems.

At the same time, a traditionalist who complains about contemporary martial arts should remember the value of any system is its ability to adapt to present-day needs. Today’s Choy Li Fut, while still considered a traditional system, is far more contemporary than the original version.

There is a place in the martial arts for both traditional and modern attitudes, Like a new house that cannot stand without a solid foundation, so too martial arts must have both traditional and modern values to maintain the past while building for the future.

by Grandmaster Doc Fai Wong Inside Kung Fu Magazine, March 1987

Editors Note: Many of today's top mixed martial arts fighters have backgrounds in traditional martial arts training. As the sport of MMA continues to evolve and the use of systems becomes more widespread, perhaps the question is more relevant today than every before.

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Holiday Sale 2015 White Dragon Martial Arts

Get inspired this holiday season! Plan to save big at White Dragon’s Annual Holiday Sale on Saturday, December 5, 2015. When you upgrade your membership at the sale, you'll enjoy some of the lowest tuition prices of the year. Also, save up to 40% off supplies and equipment that you’ll need for the next level.

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White_Dragon_Martial_Arts_San_Diego_Rescue_Mission_Donation.JPGMaster Nathan Fisher Presenting a Check for $5400 to the San Diego Rescue Mission. White Dragon has raised over 10k so far in 2015.

On Sunday, October 11, 2015, White Dragon celebrated it’s 30 Year Anniversary at a banquet for 362 students, instructors, friends and family at Jasmine Chinese Restaurant. Grandmaster Doc-Fai Wong, all 10 of White Dragon’s Sifus, as well as several visiting Plum Blossom Federation Sifus were also in attendance.  Remarks from White Dragon’s Founder, Master Nathan Fisher follow:

“Wow…..White Dragon is officially 30 years old!  You know, 3 decades of existence for any organization is an incredible accomplishment. And, we have a lot to be proud of: like the fact that White Dragon is the oldest and largest group of schools in Grandmaster’s Plum Blossom International Federation. And, outside of Grandmaster’s Headquarters School, we’ve also produced the most high-ranking Sifus, the most black sash students, and the most instructors over those 30 years than any other school in the Federation.  

But these achievements have definitely not come easily. In fact, it’s been very challenging at times. And we definitely would NOT still be here, if it weren’t for some very special people:

Firstly, White Dragon has a truly amazing staff of young men and women who dedicate themselves each and every week to transforming our students into great martial artists. Your time, your energy, and your patience help me and your Sifus build and sustain an organization that benefits thousands of people each year. You make it possible for traditional martial arts to flourish in an age where many such schools are closing. So, let me just say “thank you” on behalf of your students, your Sifus and Grandmaster for all that you do for the school.

Secondly, White Dragon has an absolutely incredible, amazing group of Sifus who work harder than any martial artists I’ve ever seen. Didn’t they do a fantastic performance for you the other night at the exhibition? You guys make it possible for students of all ages to learn our incredibly sophisticated system of martial arts. In you, lives the hope of a future where traditional martial arts flourish, because through your expertise and leadership you make our traditional system relevant to today’s generation of students. Without you, White Dragon simply would not exist. So, I want to thank you personally for all that you do for your students and for me. I couldn’t ask for a better adopted family than you!

Thirdly, I have to acknowledge the indispensable contribution of my teacher, who has supported White Dragon by working with me, and our staff and students, for 30 years. You continue to amaze us with the depth of your knowledge and the depth of your caring for our students. All these years, you’ve been coming to San Diego to share your expertise with us, and we will not let you down. In the years ahead, you will see even more students practicing the martial arts you love. And together, we will build a lasting legacy of improving people’s lives with the valuable lessons you’ve taught us.

I also want to thank our great students, some of whom have been training at White Dragon for decades.  People like Mr. and Mrs. the Spear, who’ve been training in the La Mesa since 1993, or Cassandra Wong with us since 1990. Or Joe Vasconcellos, training in Clairemont since 1990, or Kendrick Eaton, with us since 2000. There are so many more who are here tonight, that have practiced with us for more than a decade.  Your support has afforded us the time to live our lives as martial artists and as teachers focused on helping others. In my opinion, there is no better life to live.  So, thank you for your continued support of the work that we do. I can’t wait to see what we can accomplish together over the next 30 years.

Finally, I want to give thanks to the community in which we’ve made our home. The people of San Diego have allowed us to prosper and grow through good and bad times, and yet too many of the people who live here go without the bare necessities of food and shelter. So, in an effort to tackle this ever growing problem, this year White Dragon began donating a portion of all special event proceeds to the San Diego Rescue Mission, an organization that’s been serving the homeless here in San Diego for the past 60 years. So far this year, with your help, we’ve been able to raise a total of $10,300 to further this great cause.  

So, this evening I am pleased to present a check for $4850 to the Rescue Mission’s Director of Community Events, Mr. Ryan Chambers. Let’s give him a warm welcome…

Now, before we start the feast, I just want to mention one more person who’s done an awesome job for the school over the past few years. He’s been training with Tai Sifu Tittle for over 10 years now. And, he’s been a key part of the team that built White Dragon Chula Vista into the largest school in our organization. To recognize all this exemplary work, it is my great pleasure to officially promote him to the level of Assistant Chief Instructor of the Chula Vista school. Ladies and Gentlemen, please join me in congratulating, Mr. Galih Bimaputra.  Congratulations Mr. Bimaputra!”

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 Choy Li Fut Kung Fu Throwing Techniques

Throwing and knock-down techniques are a big part of Choy Li Fut kung fut's overall self-defense strategy.

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At White Dragon Martial Arts, our mission is to be the best in the world at improving the lives of our students through the practice of martial arts. We accomplish this mission through our unique training method and by instilling core values. By teaching important values like discipline, humility, positive attitude, and respect for self and others our students learn that martial arts is a complete way life, not just a system of self-defense. The White Dragon method focuses on building a stronger mind along with a stronger body in the hope of producing confident and well rounded individuals, capable of reaching excellence in all areas of life.

Train Hard, Live Better!

White Dragon pairs every student with their own individual instructor to provide the most complete personal and group training available anywhere. Our unique combination of Kung Fu, Tai Chi, Kickboxing & MMA creates the most effective, well-rounded training experience which will help you get fit, teach you how to defend yourself, and improve your life in ways you didn’t know were possible. We’re dedicated to providing you with the highest quality martial arts instruction through a positive, values-based environment along with the most availability and flexibility to accommodate your schedule. Our vision is to help you build physical fitness and develop total self-confidence through studying martial arts so that you can excel in all aspects of life.
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