Every Great Journey Starts With One Step.

Dragon Cup 2018 - White Dragon Martial Arts.jpg

White Dragon Martial Arts proudly presents the Dragon Cup Championship, a tournament for beginners and advanced students alike. May, 5th 2018, Jenny Craig Pavillion, University of San Diego - 5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA 92110

Published in Blog

White_Dragon_Martial_Arts_Dragon_Cup_2016.jpg

The Dragon Cup Championship is set for Saturday, May 7 2016 at the Jenny Craig Pavillion, University of San Diego. White Dragon's Annual School Tournament has become one of the largest martial arts tournaments in the country. Don't miss your opportunity to represent your school and gain valuable experience!

Published in Blog

White_Dragon_Martial_Arts_San_Diego_Rescue_Mission_Donation.JPGMaster Nathan Fisher Presenting a Check for $5400 to the San Diego Rescue Mission. White Dragon has raised over 10k so far in 2015.

On Sunday, October 11, 2015, White Dragon celebrated it’s 30 Year Anniversary at a banquet for 362 students, instructors, friends and family at Jasmine Chinese Restaurant. Grandmaster Doc-Fai Wong, all 10 of White Dragon’s Sifus, as well as several visiting Plum Blossom Federation Sifus were also in attendance.  Remarks from White Dragon’s Founder, Master Nathan Fisher follow:

“Wow…..White Dragon is officially 30 years old!  You know, 3 decades of existence for any organization is an incredible accomplishment. And, we have a lot to be proud of: like the fact that White Dragon is the oldest and largest group of schools in Grandmaster’s Plum Blossom International Federation. And, outside of Grandmaster’s Headquarters School, we’ve also produced the most high-ranking Sifus, the most black sash students, and the most instructors over those 30 years than any other school in the Federation.  

But these achievements have definitely not come easily. In fact, it’s been very challenging at times. And we definitely would NOT still be here, if it weren’t for some very special people:

Firstly, White Dragon has a truly amazing staff of young men and women who dedicate themselves each and every week to transforming our students into great martial artists. Your time, your energy, and your patience help me and your Sifus build and sustain an organization that benefits thousands of people each year. You make it possible for traditional martial arts to flourish in an age where many such schools are closing. So, let me just say “thank you” on behalf of your students, your Sifus and Grandmaster for all that you do for the school.

Secondly, White Dragon has an absolutely incredible, amazing group of Sifus who work harder than any martial artists I’ve ever seen. Didn’t they do a fantastic performance for you the other night at the exhibition? You guys make it possible for students of all ages to learn our incredibly sophisticated system of martial arts. In you, lives the hope of a future where traditional martial arts flourish, because through your expertise and leadership you make our traditional system relevant to today’s generation of students. Without you, White Dragon simply would not exist. So, I want to thank you personally for all that you do for your students and for me. I couldn’t ask for a better adopted family than you!

Thirdly, I have to acknowledge the indispensable contribution of my teacher, who has supported White Dragon by working with me, and our staff and students, for 30 years. You continue to amaze us with the depth of your knowledge and the depth of your caring for our students. All these years, you’ve been coming to San Diego to share your expertise with us, and we will not let you down. In the years ahead, you will see even more students practicing the martial arts you love. And together, we will build a lasting legacy of improving people’s lives with the valuable lessons you’ve taught us.

I also want to thank our great students, some of whom have been training at White Dragon for decades.  People like Mr. and Mrs. the Spear, who’ve been training in the La Mesa since 1993, or Cassandra Wong with us since 1990. Or Joe Vasconcellos, training in Clairemont since 1990, or Kendrick Eaton, with us since 2000. There are so many more who are here tonight, that have practiced with us for more than a decade.  Your support has afforded us the time to live our lives as martial artists and as teachers focused on helping others. In my opinion, there is no better life to live.  So, thank you for your continued support of the work that we do. I can’t wait to see what we can accomplish together over the next 30 years.

Finally, I want to give thanks to the community in which we’ve made our home. The people of San Diego have allowed us to prosper and grow through good and bad times, and yet too many of the people who live here go without the bare necessities of food and shelter. So, in an effort to tackle this ever growing problem, this year White Dragon began donating a portion of all special event proceeds to the San Diego Rescue Mission, an organization that’s been serving the homeless here in San Diego for the past 60 years. So far this year, with your help, we’ve been able to raise a total of $10,300 to further this great cause.  

So, this evening I am pleased to present a check for $4850 to the Rescue Mission’s Director of Community Events, Mr. Ryan Chambers. Let’s give him a warm welcome…

Now, before we start the feast, I just want to mention one more person who’s done an awesome job for the school over the past few years. He’s been training with Tai Sifu Tittle for over 10 years now. And, he’s been a key part of the team that built White Dragon Chula Vista into the largest school in our organization. To recognize all this exemplary work, it is my great pleasure to officially promote him to the level of Assistant Chief Instructor of the Chula Vista school. Ladies and Gentlemen, please join me in congratulating, Mr. Galih Bimaputra.  Congratulations Mr. Bimaputra!”

Published in Blog

 Choy Li Fut Kung Fu Throwing Techniques

Throwing and knock-down techniques are a big part of Choy Li Fut kung fut's overall self-defense strategy.

Published in Blog

White_Dragon_Martial_Arts_-_Safety_First.jpgMartial arts -- the term is based on fighting. Originally, martial arts training was often the deciding factor in life and death combat situations. Some martial arts started with armies, where soldiers learned the military art of survival at the enemy’s expense. Others were developed for common people who needed to defend their families and possessions.

Today, the fighting aspect of martial arts is for self-defense . Our modern society says that settling disputes by first or weapon fights is antisocial and illegal. So we learn self-defense, on the premise that it might just save our lives someday -- and it might.

However, there’s a big difference between self-defense fighting, where anything goes to save yourself from bodily harm, and sparring, the most common expression of martial arts fighting. Too many people seem to think that sparring and fighting are one and the same. If you’re tough in the studio or tournament, you’ll be tough on the street, because fighting is what it’s all about.

Wrong. Self-defense fighting and sparring are two entirely different things. Those of you who teach martial arts are going to have to realize that, because the number of injuries across the country in martial arts schools and tournaments is forcing insurance companies and state regulatory agencies to crack down on the concept of sparring.

Although it may have been rough and tough in the good old days of the survival of the fittest, things are different now. Major insurance companies are telling school owners and tournament promoters that no head contact is allowed in the school or at tournament. They’re requiring students and competitors to wear protective head, hand and foot gear, or they won’t carry the school’s insurance policy.

I don’t know about other states, but California’s martial arts tournaments are regulated by the state athletic commission. They put out a rule book every year, nicknamed the “red book”. Here’s how the red book describes martial arts sparring contests.

Article Two, Section 18627 defines the term full and light contact for martial arts. It says, “Full contact means the use of full unrestrained physical force in a martial arts contest. Light contact means the use of controlled martial arts techniques whereby contract to the body is permitted in a restrained manner, no contact to the face is permitted, and no contact is permitted which may result or is intended to result in physical harm to the opponent.”

In California, all full-contact, and that includes head contact, contests must be licensed by either the state athletic commission or the Amateur Athletic Union. So if you’re putting on a tournament that allows any head contact, and it’s not license, you’re breaking the law. Of course, if your insurance carrier finds out, they probably won’t honor any claim from your tournament.

What amazes me in the very few California tournament promoters who are even aware that their tournaments come under state jurisdiction, much less know the laws about light and full contact. Even though California’s law is clear, many people still misunderstand, allowing what they call kiss contact or light head contact in their tournaments. Each year these promoters unwittingly sponsor illegal martial arts contests. Since California is planning to crack down on such events, those unknowing promoters may unfortunately find out the hard way.

Many schools advertise full-contact training. It’s legal to train full-contact fighters in schools, at least in California. Boxing (kickboxing and mma) gyms do it all the time. However, are these martial arts schools really full-contact schools? Are the students actually knocked out during training? Do they allow punches and kicks to the face? Remember the insurance companies say that if you allow contact to the face, there could be a chance of knocking out the student with a blow to the head of his head striking the floor on the way down.

Personally, I think that insurance companies are right. Today’s martial art schools are not the same as in the old days. Not only can a blow to the head cause injuries, it can create negative feeling in the school. Sometimes when students get punched or kicked in the face, they lose their tempers and fight back in anger. And, for those of us who teach minors, parents hate to see their child injured.

That controversy about pulling punches ruining your ability to actually hit something is not true. You can use bags for power and penetration. If you can hit your opponent’s body in sparring practice, you’ll still have plenty of ability to hit a face in self-defense.

Don’t misunderstand me. I teach sparring and I teach self-defense. Most self-defense techniques cannot be practiced safely in sparring class, so students develop their fighting power on bags, dummies, forms practice, and two-person sets. Sparring is a way to develop better timing, tactical knowledge, footwork, reflexes, and awareness.

by Doc Fai Wong

Published in Blog

White_Dragon_Martial_Arts_San_Diego_Resuce_Mission_Donation.jpg

White Dragon's annual school tournament, the Dragon Cup Championship, raised $5400 for the San Diego Rescue Mission to help with homelessness in San Diego County. The San Diego Rescue Mission is a non-profit, faith-based organization committed to assisting the homeless in a transition from an environment of poverty and dependency to self-sufficiency.

Published in Blog

White_Dragon_Martial_Arts_-_Photo_Booth_Poster.jpg

On this Saturday, October 18, 2014, regular group classes at White Dragon Mira Mesa will be cancelled and substituted with the classes listed below. We have the privilege of having Tai-Sigung Nathan Fisher direct a photoshoot for our new website. We'd like to capture you at your best doing tai chi, kung fu, and combative training like kickboxing & grappling. All students from all school locations are encouraged to participate in these classes. Please come in full uniform to be a part of our new website design. Thank you for your patience and cooperation!

Published in Blog

Our Mission & Values...

At White Dragon Martial Arts, our mission is to be the best in the world at improving the lives of our students through the practice of martial arts. We accomplish this mission through our unique training method and by instilling core values. By teaching important values like discipline, humility, positive attitude, and respect for self and others our students learn that martial arts is a complete way life, not just a system of self-defense. The White Dragon method focuses on building a stronger mind along with a stronger body in the hope of producing confident and well rounded individuals, capable of reaching excellence in all areas of life.

Train Hard, Live Better!

White Dragon pairs every student with their own individual instructor to provide the most complete personal and group training available anywhere. Our unique combination of Kung Fu, Tai Chi, Kickboxing & MMA creates the most effective, well-rounded training experience which will help you get fit, teach you how to defend yourself, and improve your life in ways you didn’t know were possible. We’re dedicated to providing you with the highest quality martial arts instruction through a positive, values-based environment along with the most availability and flexibility to accommodate your schedule. Our vision is to help you build physical fitness and develop total self-confidence through studying martial arts so that you can excel in all aspects of life.
PROUD MEMBER OF:   AWARDS:
proudmember Channel 10 A-List Logo