Every Great Journey Starts With One Step.

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The Dragon Cup Championship is set for Saturday, May 7 2016 at the Jenny Craig Pavillion, University of San Diego. White Dragon's Annual School Tournament has become one of the largest martial arts tournaments in the country. Don't miss your opportunity to represent your school and gain valuable experience!

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Holiday Sale 2015 White Dragon Martial Arts

Get inspired this holiday season! Plan to save big at White Dragon’s Annual Holiday Sale on Saturday, December 5, 2015. When you upgrade your membership at the sale, you'll enjoy some of the lowest tuition prices of the year. Also, save up to 40% off supplies and equipment that you’ll need for the next level.

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White_Dragon_Martial_Arts_San_Diego_Rescue_Mission_Donation.JPGMaster Nathan Fisher Presenting a Check for $5400 to the San Diego Rescue Mission. White Dragon has raised over 10k so far in 2015.

On Sunday, October 11, 2015, White Dragon celebrated it’s 30 Year Anniversary at a banquet for 362 students, instructors, friends and family at Jasmine Chinese Restaurant. Grandmaster Doc-Fai Wong, all 10 of White Dragon’s Sifus, as well as several visiting Plum Blossom Federation Sifus were also in attendance.  Remarks from White Dragon’s Founder, Master Nathan Fisher follow:

“Wow…..White Dragon is officially 30 years old!  You know, 3 decades of existence for any organization is an incredible accomplishment. And, we have a lot to be proud of: like the fact that White Dragon is the oldest and largest group of schools in Grandmaster’s Plum Blossom International Federation. And, outside of Grandmaster’s Headquarters School, we’ve also produced the most high-ranking Sifus, the most black sash students, and the most instructors over those 30 years than any other school in the Federation.  

But these achievements have definitely not come easily. In fact, it’s been very challenging at times. And we definitely would NOT still be here, if it weren’t for some very special people:

Firstly, White Dragon has a truly amazing staff of young men and women who dedicate themselves each and every week to transforming our students into great martial artists. Your time, your energy, and your patience help me and your Sifus build and sustain an organization that benefits thousands of people each year. You make it possible for traditional martial arts to flourish in an age where many such schools are closing. So, let me just say “thank you” on behalf of your students, your Sifus and Grandmaster for all that you do for the school.

Secondly, White Dragon has an absolutely incredible, amazing group of Sifus who work harder than any martial artists I’ve ever seen. Didn’t they do a fantastic performance for you the other night at the exhibition? You guys make it possible for students of all ages to learn our incredibly sophisticated system of martial arts. In you, lives the hope of a future where traditional martial arts flourish, because through your expertise and leadership you make our traditional system relevant to today’s generation of students. Without you, White Dragon simply would not exist. So, I want to thank you personally for all that you do for your students and for me. I couldn’t ask for a better adopted family than you!

Thirdly, I have to acknowledge the indispensable contribution of my teacher, who has supported White Dragon by working with me, and our staff and students, for 30 years. You continue to amaze us with the depth of your knowledge and the depth of your caring for our students. All these years, you’ve been coming to San Diego to share your expertise with us, and we will not let you down. In the years ahead, you will see even more students practicing the martial arts you love. And together, we will build a lasting legacy of improving people’s lives with the valuable lessons you’ve taught us.

I also want to thank our great students, some of whom have been training at White Dragon for decades.  People like Mr. and Mrs. the Spear, who’ve been training in the La Mesa since 1993, or Cassandra Wong with us since 1990. Or Joe Vasconcellos, training in Clairemont since 1990, or Kendrick Eaton, with us since 2000. There are so many more who are here tonight, that have practiced with us for more than a decade.  Your support has afforded us the time to live our lives as martial artists and as teachers focused on helping others. In my opinion, there is no better life to live.  So, thank you for your continued support of the work that we do. I can’t wait to see what we can accomplish together over the next 30 years.

Finally, I want to give thanks to the community in which we’ve made our home. The people of San Diego have allowed us to prosper and grow through good and bad times, and yet too many of the people who live here go without the bare necessities of food and shelter. So, in an effort to tackle this ever growing problem, this year White Dragon began donating a portion of all special event proceeds to the San Diego Rescue Mission, an organization that’s been serving the homeless here in San Diego for the past 60 years. So far this year, with your help, we’ve been able to raise a total of $10,300 to further this great cause.  

So, this evening I am pleased to present a check for $4850 to the Rescue Mission’s Director of Community Events, Mr. Ryan Chambers. Let’s give him a warm welcome…

Now, before we start the feast, I just want to mention one more person who’s done an awesome job for the school over the past few years. He’s been training with Tai Sifu Tittle for over 10 years now. And, he’s been a key part of the team that built White Dragon Chula Vista into the largest school in our organization. To recognize all this exemplary work, it is my great pleasure to officially promote him to the level of Assistant Chief Instructor of the Chula Vista school. Ladies and Gentlemen, please join me in congratulating, Mr. Galih Bimaputra.  Congratulations Mr. Bimaputra!”

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White Dragon Martial Arts is proud to host our annual seminars with Grandmaster Doc Fai Wong. Grandmaster Wong is one of the highest level Choy Li Fut Kung Fu and Tai Chi masters in the world. He comes to San Diego to work exclusively with White Dragon students.

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The biomechanics of the measured, flowing movements of tai chi demonstrate...

If you’re familiar with exercise, you know that speed is an important factor to control. For common exercises like running and weight lifting, volumes of research has shown that it’s generally necessary to move faster for a more intense cardio workout and to make measured, controlled movements for building muscles. Other workouts, like mind-body exercises (e.g., yoga and tai chi), are somewhat harder to pin down. They aren’t cardio exercises, nor are they strictly muscle building.

The slow, flowing movements of mind-body exercises have been around for centuries, and they have been shown to help people develop balance,flexibility, and muscle function. Consequently, they’ve been increasing in popularity, both for physical therapy and personal enjoyment. While these exercises are widely practiced around the world, the biomechanical basis for their effects is not well known. To gain further insight, Ge Wu and Xiaolin Ren, biomedical engineers from the University of Vermont, chose to study how the unhurried steps of tai chi benefit its practitioners. 

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Experienced tai chi instructors like Ben Stanley often remind their students that slower is better. Stanley says that “it’s about breathing and being attuned to the muscles as you’removing. It’s important not to rush it, or you could miss the full benefits of the exercise.” In fact, Edwards pointed out that “the slower you go, the harder it is, and you definitely feel it in your legs.”


Tai chi can certainly be a test of patience for the inexperienced, as it is normally performed about 10 times slower than an average walk (2 mph), but it has a similar intensity to a moderate aerobic workout. Much of its direct benefits have been reported in the legs. To determine if and how the deliberate, gradual transitions in tai chi were responsible for these benefits, Wu and Ren employed a combination of biomechanical force plates, a camera-based motion analysis system, and EMG (electromyography) electrodes. 

The 12 subjects, grouped as young (22-34 years) and old (64-80 years), performed a fundamental tai chi movement, “part wild horse’s mane,” at various speeds. Besides marking the participant’s motion from shoulder to toe, Wu and Ren measured the duration and magnitude of activation for six muscles that are key to ankle, knee, and hip mobility.

They found, as expected, that the duration of muscle activation was longer during slower motions in all six muscles. The effect was most significant for the rectus femoris (one of the quadriceps muscles) and semitendinosus (one of the hamstrings). When the participants sped up, these muscles lost this activation duration, while two muscles, the soleus (part of the calf) and semitendinosus, showed an increased activation. Thus, speeding up created an overall loss in muscle activation.

Age was also a factor in muscle activation. At slower speeds, younger subjects showed more muscle activation than older participants. This could be the result of older practitioners having a more limited range of movement. Stanley has often observed that it’s “difficult for older people to really sink down and fully extend in some of the postures compared to younger students,” but he has “seen posture, balance, and overall well being improve through time.” 

Overall, Wu and Ren observed that speed had a greater impact on lower body muscles than other factors, like age or depth of movement. Their work demonstrate that slow, controlled movements can activate muscles more than rapid motion. The approach can also be used to study additional movements in tai chi and other exercises like yoga—a thorough understanding of exercise biomechanics should allow people to make more informed choices about what activities to pursue.

Clinical Biomechanics, 2009. DOI: 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2009.03.001

by  

Read the original article in published in Ars Technica Aug, 2009

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White Dragon's annual school tournament, the Dragon Cup Championship, raised $5400 for the San Diego Rescue Mission to help with homelessness in San Diego County. The San Diego Rescue Mission is a non-profit, faith-based organization committed to assisting the homeless in a transition from an environment of poverty and dependency to self-sufficiency.

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The ancient practice appears to be good for you in just about every way.

The gentle, 2,000-year-old Chinese practice of tai chi is often described as "meditation in motion." But the Harvard Women's Health Watch newsletter suggests a more apt description is "medication in motion."

Tai chi, the most famous branch of Qigong, or exercises that harness the qi (life energy, pronounced "chee"), has been linked to health benefits for virtually everyone from children to seniors. Researchers aren't sure exactly how, but studies show that tai chi improves the quality of life for breast cancer patients and Parkinson's sufferers. Its combination of martial arts movements and deep breathing can be adapted even for people in wheelchairs. And it has shown promise in treating sleep problems and high blood pressure.

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Flexibility and strength. Tai chi is credited with so many pluses, physiological and psychological, that Chenchen Wang, an associate professor of medicine at Tufts University, set out earlier this year to analyze 40 studies on it in English and Chinese journals. Wang found that tai chi did indeed promote balance, 

flexibility, cardiovascular fitness, and strength. In a study comparing it with brisk walking and resistance training, a tai chi group improved more than 30 percent in lower-body strength and 25 percent in arm strength, nearly as much as a weight-training group and more than the walkers.

"Benefit was also found for pain, stress, and anxiety in healthy subjects," adds Wang, who was influenced by her mother, a Chinese doctor, to study an integration of complementary and alternative medicine with Western medicine.

In a 2008 analysis, Harvard Medical School's Gloria Yeh, an internist and assistant professor, reviewed 26 studies in English and Chinese and reported that in 85 percent of trials, tai chi lowered blood pressure. Other studies have shown it to reduce blood levels of B-type natriuretic peptide, a precursor of heart failure, and to maintain bone density in postmenopausal women. The nonprofit Arthritis Foundation offers its own 12-movement tai chi sequence.

Wang says more study is needed. Still, says New York Times personal health writer Jane Brody: "After reviewing existing scientific evidence for its potential health benefits, I've concluded that the proper question to ask yourself may not be why you should practice tai chi, but why not."

Lesson One: Find a teacher. "Learning from a book or video just does not work," says Greg Woodson, vice president of the international T'ai Chi Foundation and a teacher for 35 years. Students need real feedback from a teacher who can make sure exercises are done correctly "so the practice does not cause the type of injury it's designed to alleviate," he says. One example: Weight-bearing feet need to be flat on the floor to avoid knee stress, "an extremely subtle point that an experienced teacher will see." Woodson suggests that if a teacher has less than 10 years of experience, you should make sure he or she has the backing of a school or a more experienced teacher.

How much tai chi is enough? "Data suggest the minimum amount for effective results" is once- or twice-weekly sessions for eight to 12 weeks, says Wang. No pain, big gains.

by Courtney Rubin | Nov. 26, 2010 

Read the original article in U.S News Health here.

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Our Mission & Values...

At White Dragon Martial Arts, our mission is to be the best in the world at improving the lives of our students through the practice of martial arts. We accomplish this mission through our unique training method and by instilling core values. By teaching important values like discipline, humility, positive attitude, and respect for self and others our students learn that martial arts is a complete way life, not just a system of self-defense. The White Dragon method focuses on building a stronger mind along with a stronger body in the hope of producing confident and well rounded individuals, capable of reaching excellence in all areas of life.

Train Hard, Live Better!

White Dragon pairs every student with their own individual instructor to provide the most complete personal and group training available anywhere. Our unique combination of Kung Fu, Tai Chi, Kickboxing & MMA creates the most effective, well-rounded training experience which will help you get fit, teach you how to defend yourself, and improve your life in ways you didn’t know were possible. We’re dedicated to providing you with the highest quality martial arts instruction through a positive, values-based environment along with the most availability and flexibility to accommodate your schedule. Our vision is to help you build physical fitness and develop total self-confidence through studying martial arts so that you can excel in all aspects of life.
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